Wednesday, April 6, 2011

E is for Escape

I talked to my dad on the phone last night. Apparently, he had heard from the place where my mother now lives. They mentioned they have removed the ankle bracelet. Mom is calmer now.

See, she was placed in a home in the middle of February, because she decided to take a walk in the middle of the night from her own house. We were fortunate that Dad figured it out quickly and he called the authorities to go look for her. We had a quick and rough battle to get her placed from the hospital. But at that point, it was obvious that my father could no longer care for her on his own. Especially if she was going to start wandering at 1:30 in the morning.

When she was placed in her new accommodations, she kept begging my father to take her home. Actually, she still asks here and there, but with less tenacity. Apparently, they took her to be a flight risk, as well.

One day, the ankle bracelet malfunctioned. She managed to get out the back door. It took THREE grown adults to wrestle her back inside. Hey, we are strong women! My mommy grew up on a farm, so she is built tough!

I still remember one night when I was visiting over Christmas break. She wanted to take out the trash in the middle of the night. I kept saying no, and literally stood in her way. That woman actually started looking me up and down, sizing me up, trying to decide if she could take me! At that point, I thought for sure I would win, but after hearing how it took three adults to get her back inside the facility, I'm not so sure! I still chuckle when I try to picture the catfight that could have ensued.....

Wandering is a common part of the Alzheimer's world. Again, we were lucky that she was quickly found. Others are not so lucky. Many people were upset with me when I was saying that I actually hoped she would run off, so that we could finally get her placed. But, I think I also had faith that it would work out okay in the end. And it has.

12 comments:

  1. This sounds virtually identical to stories about my friend's mum who also has Alzheimer's. She escaped from her care home one morning and was halfway home before anyone found her!

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  2. One of my fondest memories of my great-aunt is when she and her roomie at their nursing home planned an escape. She managed to get the phone reconnected on her house so that the two could live there. They had a cab waiting out front of the home, and they had made it out of the safe zone just into the foyer before they were discovered. Their plan almost worked! Funny and scary. They had ankle bracelets after that as well.

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  3. I've never had to deal with Alzheimers. It's probably one of the saddest diseases for not only the one suffering from it, but for family members as well.
    To read my "E" blot post please go to the top blog at http://myheartblogstoyou.blogspot.com/

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  4. My 84 year old mother is beginning to face dementia, forgetting many vocabulary words and experiences happening more than a year or two ago. It's very sad to see. Thank you for your post.

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  5. How Scary. I haven't had to deal with Alzheimers in my family, I couldn't imagine.

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  6. This is a very touching post. I've never had any experience with Alzheimer's. I know that this post doesn't even being to explain to me what it is like dealing with this disease, but thanks for opening my eyes a little.

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  7. My grandmother never left, but she threatened to a number of times and opened the door more than once. Until we baby proofed it and she gave up.

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  8. I love your site and as I browsed your blog I decided to award you the Inspiring Blog Award.
    Go to http://astorybookworld.blogspot.com/p/awards.html and pick up your award.
    ~Deirdra

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  9. i live with my wife who has Alzheimer. we live in our home for now, but the medical bills are taking our home. i don't know how to tell you just how bad Alzheimer's is on the love ones. for the most part the person with it, does not know that there is any thing wrong.
    thank you and god bless

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  10. Grandma has left. My parents now have a bell on her door so that if she leaves it rings in their house to let them know.
    She told my mom one day she was going to look for a job and my mom said, 'you ain't no spring chicken! No one is going to hire you!' We laugh because what else can you do? Cry? Yeah, we do plenty of that too.

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  11. You are providing such a wonderful ministry here to all those who are dealing with Alzheimer's Disease. Thanks so much for opening your heart and sharing your insights.

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  12. I used to work at a nursing home -- many of these experiences sound familiar. One of the patients was convinced one of the others was her son. She was mean to everyone except this one other resident. Great post. Thank you.

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